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25 May 2014 200 views
 
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photoblog image The Ramblers Church

The Ramblers Church

The Old church at Walesby has become a place of pilgrimage and popular for ramblers. Hence the adopted name of The Ramblers Church. The church is accessed from Walesby village by an ancient if somewhat muddy track of about 500 yards, also from across the fields and over stiles from Walesby Hill and from the SE from Tealby. Situated in the picturesque Wolds, the view from the church is quite spectacular across the plains and on days of good visibility Lincoln Cathedral, 20 miles away, can be seen with the naked eye.

All Saints described by John Betjeman as "an exceptionally attractive church worth bicycling twelve miles against the wind to see"

 

There is evidence that the ancient site of which the Old Church stands has Saxon or Norman foundations. The church represents every period from 12C to 15C architecture.

 

In 1861 the remains of a Roman villa was excavated to the east of the church and coins found date the settlement to c.320, there is also strong evidence that an earlier Saxon church stood on the site. Saxon graves have been excavated to the immediate east of the church, c.600

 

The church has eight bells, two surviving from the medieval period. The clock was given to mark the Silver Jubilee of King George V and its ‘Guilford Chimes' strike on all eight bells, unlike the more usual five bell chime.

 

There is written evidence that the church was repaired and re-roofed in the 1820's for the expense of nearly £1000. However the church did fall into disrepair and an ‘iron church was erected in 1881 in the village.

 

All Saints was renovated in the 1930's and became known as the Ramblers Church. A beautiful stain glass window depicting walkers and cyclists was donated by the local ramblers in 1951. Renovation work was also carried out in the 1980s. Recently substantial work was carried out on the Tower to make it safe to ring the bells.

The Ramblers Church

The Old church at Walesby has become a place of pilgrimage and popular for ramblers. Hence the adopted name of The Ramblers Church. The church is accessed from Walesby village by an ancient if somewhat muddy track of about 500 yards, also from across the fields and over stiles from Walesby Hill and from the SE from Tealby. Situated in the picturesque Wolds, the view from the church is quite spectacular across the plains and on days of good visibility Lincoln Cathedral, 20 miles away, can be seen with the naked eye.

All Saints described by John Betjeman as "an exceptionally attractive church worth bicycling twelve miles against the wind to see"

 

There is evidence that the ancient site of which the Old Church stands has Saxon or Norman foundations. The church represents every period from 12C to 15C architecture.

 

In 1861 the remains of a Roman villa was excavated to the east of the church and coins found date the settlement to c.320, there is also strong evidence that an earlier Saxon church stood on the site. Saxon graves have been excavated to the immediate east of the church, c.600

 

The church has eight bells, two surviving from the medieval period. The clock was given to mark the Silver Jubilee of King George V and its ‘Guilford Chimes' strike on all eight bells, unlike the more usual five bell chime.

 

There is written evidence that the church was repaired and re-roofed in the 1820's for the expense of nearly £1000. However the church did fall into disrepair and an ‘iron church was erected in 1881 in the village.

 

All Saints was renovated in the 1930's and became known as the Ramblers Church. A beautiful stain glass window depicting walkers and cyclists was donated by the local ramblers in 1951. Renovation work was also carried out in the 1980s. Recently substantial work was carried out on the Tower to make it safe to ring the bells.

comments (7)

  • CherryPie
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 25 May 2014, 01:36
Lovely artwork. I like the ramblers and the cyclists and also the small poppy detail too smile
paul: we visited in the pouring rain and were very glad of the shelter it provided
Beautiful image of this lovely glass! Thanks for the very interesting info!
paul: It is an interesting church which became redundant when the parishioners got sick of walking up the hill and built a new one at the bottom instead!
  • Chris
  • England
  • 25 May 2014, 06:33
Delightful contemporary stained glass Paul, it sounds an attractive place
paul: the glass is the only remotely contemporary thing about the place
A fine piece of glass. These ramblers are very wholesome looking
paul: quite disturbingly so I thought
What a wonderful distinction. It really plays homage to walking and it's practitioners. I love the idea so much. Nice glass work too.
paul: It is on the route of a major footpath and I'm sure many ramblers have been grateful for the shelter it provides - I know we were. It was pouring down when we visited
A church with a history, and these windows really tell a story don't they.
paul: the countryside around is really beautiful too Brian
A lovely stained glass window that tells a modern day story. I shall add this to my list to visit one day.
paul: it is worth the effort suzanne

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